What’s Up?

Words.
They can be quite fascinating—individually, or bunched together.
A fun little tidbit was brought to my attention by a writer friend. She attributed it to a journalist, Paul Arcand. I copied and posted it to my personal page, but decided to find out if Mr. Arcand was the originator … or if it was one of those bits of trivia “making the rounds” … research is not my forté, but before I share the piece, I thought I’d share my research.

Since Mr. Arcand (on his personal page) did not divulge his source, I was forced to do my own due diligence … and turned to Google for help. I popping the entire piece (I know, I know … I was simply curious if it would give me different results that way) into the search box yielded me several options. I sought out the oldest entry, from 2013. Not all that old, but a start.

It was a Moravia.com link and the article was attributed to Lee Densmer. In her article, she linked another page as the possible origination—Tysknews.com. It linked directly to the piece in question … but there was no clue as to who wrote it. When I got to the end, I saw additional text—much smaller, and outside of the main boxed text.

It made me laugh. “I gave up trying to determine who is responsible for writing this up.” Yup … on that note, I too decided that this was the end of the line for my research. FYI: If you go to each link, you will see that there are minor tweaks to the Tysknews’ version. I made no corrections—simply copied and pasted. (A heads-up: there is some potty humour at the end (insert eye roll … really??)  Unfortunately, in the pasting process, indentations disappeared, but it really does not change the information. So, my dear readers, it is on that same note that I present you with this bit of funny trivia about a singular word:

This is Interesting and funny all at the same time
A reminder that one word in the English language that can be a noun, verb, adjective, adverb and preposition.
UP Read until the end … You’ll laugh.
This two-letter word in English has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that word is ‘UP.’ It is listed in the dictionary as an [adv.], [prep.], [adj.], [n] or [v].
It’s easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?
At a meeting, why does a topic come UP? Why do we speak UP, and why are the officers UP for election and why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report? We call UP our friends, brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver, warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen. We lock UP the house and fix UP the old car.
At other times, this little word has real special meaning. People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses.
To be dressed is one thing but to be dressed UP is special.
And this UP is confusing: A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.
We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night. We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!
To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look UP the word UP in the dictionary. In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4 of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions.
If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used. It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don’t give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more.
When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP. When the sun comes out, we say it is clearing UP. When it rains, the earth soaks it UP. When it does not rain for awhile, things dry UP. One could go on and on, but I’ll wrap it UP, for now . . . My time is UP!
Oh . . . One more thing: What is the first thing you do in the morning and the last thing you do at night?
U P ! Did that one crack you UP? Don’t screw UP. Send this on to everyone you look UP in your address book . . . Or not . . . it’s UP to you.
Now I’ll shut UP!

So … on that note, I wish all of you a blessed Friday, weekend and upcoming week. May serendipity reign supreme …

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