WEEK SEVEN: Farewell Skye …

Coffee/Food Stop

Don’t forget to click on images to see full photos

IS IT REALLY SEVEN WEEKS?? I could have stayed so much longer on Skye. It was amazing. A teaser for all my senses. The scenery, the cottage industries … even the history. I would like to come back—alone next time. This has been a bustling week, with non-stop chatter. Sandy and I are back to traveling by ourselves and I am enjoying the relative quiet. It’s not to say that I didn’t enjoy my time with the CIVers—we had a blast—but I’m apparently not used to that much conversation happening all day. I’m learning. Inverness SkylineLearning to say no to going out with the group—missing out on sightseeing—for health’s sake. Apparently, that’s a hard lesson for me to grasp—or at least one I’m not readily willing to accept. This whole trip has been a learning experience—just like all my previous trips. I’m learning I like “alone” better. I’m not the social butterfly some people think.

My allergies have taken a toll on my state of health. I’m on edge with loud noises—I find myself seeking solitude constantly. Music, huge amounts of chatter in the dining areas … things like that are jarring to my senses—especially my fluid-filled ears. The further away from Inverness I get, the better I feel—yay (and the offending trigger: lemongrass cleaner, I think. Even the hostel in Ft. Augustus used it to mop the floors—midge deterrent).

Young Busker Playing BagpipesSkye, Inverness, Fort Augustus (Loch Ness), across Scotland to Aberdeen … then on Friday, onto Edinburgh for a second look. We “slowed down” in Aberdeen and for Edinburgh—three whole nights in each location <insert grin> so we could explore Hanging Planter on Building in Invernessmore. Honestly, my first full day in Aberdeen was a day to recuperate—even if we did wander around (a 3-mile meander) and saw Victoria Garden, plus two chemists and two grocers as we searched for things on our “to buy” list. Trying to stay healthy is a Ft. Augustus Hostel Roomchallenge when one is traveling out of country. You’re on the go all the time. Remembering to mention “handicap” (at least for me, it’s hard to admit it) so I don’t have to climb up to the upper bunk & can have a room with the least number of Water spilling over a lock at Ft. Augustussteps. Down-time is hard to come by, too. And medicines can be different—some that are available over the counter at home are scrips here, while others are over the counter here are scrips at home. Trying to find the right

Storekeeper in Ft. Augustus with Shaped Images from Books

I took this one for the framed artwork behind her—images created out of full books. May do this with my series.

strength is fun too. I had to giggle. One chemist helped me to figure out what I should buy, but in reality, I should not have been able to purchase it. Naproxen (Aleve) 250mg—stronger than the over the counter version (220mg) at home

Local Wildlife Sightings 2017 ...

… they forgot midges (oh, my!!)

—is usually a scrip here, but it can be purchased over the counter for menstrual cramps—you must be between 15-50 to make the purchase <serious case of giggles here> Really?? Well, I did purchase a package of them (a whole nine pills!)—it seems absurd to me, but the chemist "Mall" at Invernesssaid to mention female problems (if asked) and it shouldn’t be an issue. Other things just aren’t there at all—in any form. So, my advise is to check and Loch Ness Mapdouble check what meds you bring. Make sure you have what you need. You can go to Boots.com (for the UK—check to see what company dominates in the country you’ll be visiting) and check with them to see if they have something comparable.

All-In-One: Petrol, Groceries, Gifts, Post Office and Pharmacy

A little bit of everything here!

It will save you a lot of grief later on down the line. I apparently did not do the double check for several things. I cannot find anything stronger than 30C in homeopathic River Scene in Ft. Augustusmeds (requires a script), and I’m having a devil of a time finding CoQ10 and Omega-3 in any strength … At least I was smart enough to have my prescriptions refilled and “topped off” with a 30-day vacation script before I left. I’ll need to get my refills done fairly close to when I arrive home, but I am good to go.

Victoria Park-Giant Chess Boards and Whimsical FencingThough I was interested in seeing what the Fort Augustus hostel receptionist meant by “different” when describing Aberdeen, we really didn’t venture far. There were loads of castles to see (if you’re in to castles … me, not so much) and a botanical garden down in the Center of town, but nothing nearby (except two gardens, which we did visit)—with my ankle acting up, buses seem to be the only way to see much of anything. Even Sandy’s injury (horse stepping on foot early on in our trip) seemed Aberdeen Weatherto flare as we tried to decide what to do. Gorgeous weather the entire time we were Victoria Park-Giant Chess Boards and Whimsical Fencing in Aberdeen. Sigh. So much for doing much walking or even sight-seeing. Aberdeen became a place to mend our bodies … and for me to work on my blogging. Guess I’ll have to find another Picture of book: "My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece"—Good Readbook to read, too. Last night, I finished one I’ve been working on. Very cool point of view, very well done, too. I loved reading “My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece” by Annabel Pitcher.

We will pretty much saidImage of homes in Aberdeen BBC: Scotland sign in Aberdeen good-bye to Scotland after finishing up our stay in Edinburgh (first day will be Friday (29June)—a short drive, unless I make a huge mistake again). A few friends have posted on Facebook about a bog fire that will be just south of the route we will take to one of our hotels (Stokes on Trent). Not sure if they’ll have it under control by the time we get down that far. We’ll probably go through smoke—hopefully nothing more. I’ll let you know when we get closer to that point in our travels.

In the meantime, I’ll say adieu, farewell and have a blessed Friday, weekend and week ahead. May the week be peppered with serendipity <insert warm glowing smile> Cheers!

SIXTH WEEK: Good-bye Edinburgh, Hello Inverness and Isle of Skye!

EDINBURGH BID US ADIEU—WITH WIND. Lots of wind. Sandy spent Thursday on her own and had to stick with me (in the car) on Friday as we drove to Inverness. It wasn’t a long drive, but plenty of the “I’ve-seen-this-before” countryside—which doesn’t bother me (and I actually love whatever the area provides for scenery) … but puts Sandy to sleep as a passenger—also safer for her motion sickness. Friday was spent settling into the Waverley Guest House Our View at Waverley Guest House and trying to figure out how we were going to sleep. The room was higher at the far end, lowest at the door. Our beds were set parallel to the “door wall” … and the head of each bed was so low (from overuse and no mattress flipping). Sandy chose to put her backpack in the low spot (under the mattress) and I chose to put my head at the foot of the bed <grin> The only problem we had was the music that started up at ten and went on to I-don’t-know-when … and (at least for me …) the air freshener used on everything. When morning came, both of us were blurry-eyed and I had a major stuffy nose. I’ve crossed my fingers, hoping that parking in the disabled parking is not going to get my car clamped (I did ask a “Parking Police” if it was okay, but he may not have understood how long I was talking about …)—we’ll find out next Saturday, I guess …

Loch Ness ... and stairs to itOur first day (Saturday) of the tour was wet—no biggie. I’ve got a raincoat, but didn’t pull it out because the rain was too light to bother. We stopped at a Loch Ness gift shop (teehee—I bought a t-shirt with “Loch Ness—Scotland” and a celtic design on it Loch Ness—View from gift shopto use as pjs), snapped a few photos and moved on. There were a few stops for photo ops <insert grin> along the way to the ferry … but, with the weather and Another Loch with Moody Skieswind, we chose to take the bridge across to the Isle of Skye instead (I’m sure Sandy appreciated that, though she said nothing about it). Marc and Pace played their instruments for us to end the evening on a high note.

Sunday (purple—see google map link below) was spent hiking up in the hills (fairly near our cottage) called The Quiraing, wandering View from Lower Level of The Quiraingaround. It was beautiful—windy, but beautiful. Actually, both are View of Skye from The Quiraingunderstatements. We found buying groceries on a Sunday to be a challenge, but we succeeded—the Staffin Bay Store had most of what we needed.
Monday (red) was a guided tour around the area, showing us Windy, Cloudy Skies along the Coast of Skye Driving in Skye with Moody Skies (but not stopping at): Brothers Point (where the recently found dino tracks are), Man of Storr, the town of Portree (we did lots of wandering around here … lots), Kilted Rock, with Edinbane as our turn-around point. We stopped at a Session with Marcbigger grocery store on our way back to pick up the stuff we couldn’t find at the co-op store. We ended the day with a lovely session with Marc and his autoharp.
Tuesday (yellow?) was a day of climbing. Climbing up to Man The Man of Storrof Storr … (yeah, I didn’t make it anywhere near the second gate—apparently there were four gates, so no pics), a quick Kilt Rock Kilted Rock (looks like there's more than one) Waterfall Near Kilted Rocktrip through the Staffin (dino) museum, Kilted Rock, climbing up to castle ruins (oh, my gosh—windy is an understatement), walking around Portree for a shopping spree, exploring and climbing down to see dino tracks near our cottage. Off and on rain all day, wind all the time … it’s beginning to get to my sinuses <insert pout>
Boarding Boat for Three-Hour CruiseIf it’s Wednesday, it’s a three-hour boat cruise from Uig (ewe-ig) out to an island with puffins. It was on the opposite side of the island, so we had lots of time to see flora and fauna on the way. For some reason, everyone kept humming the tune from Marc Playing Autoharp on the Radiant Queen View of the Uig Bay & BoatGilligan’s Island <giggle> Image of underside of thatched roofWhilst we waited for the time to board, we wandered into the pottery store (beautiful locally made pieces). I’ll be on their website when I get home … <insert sheepish grin>Poster about found cache and homestead
The puffins were actually there in abundance—last time (Galway), the cruise was on very windy, rough waters … with not one puffin in sight <pout>. This time around, it was beautiful—with only one wee little rough spot with a touch of wind and rain.  We had a few sessions on the boat with Marc (autoharp) and one of those included Pace with his tin flute (missed that one). Sandy stayed ashore due to motion sickness—she would not have appreciated the beauty. She’d be hugging the porcelain throne the whole time. She did miss out on some lovely scenery. Hope my photography )or one of the other CIVer’s—Selena managed some lovely shots!) will suffice … Bidding the Owners of Radiant Queen AdieuOh. Did I mention that the roads we were driving on were mostly single-track (only one lane wide)? They have an amazing system of “Passing Places”—little pull-outs spaces regularly. Whoever Traffic Jam ... sheep on roadis closest either moves forward to it, or backs up to it. Everyone has been very polite about sharing the roadway (well, save one—he must have been an American … <giggle>). It’s perfect. Oh, yeah—and the sheep have the right of way <giggle> And Highland Coo!… we found Coo! They were very, very scarce on this trip <insert pout>
Thursday was a late start sheep crossing the road(thankfully) … we were on the road by 9:30, heading to the other side of the island again. Marc told us a number of times what the agenda was—but my blurry brain was more like a On The Move—Quick Grab of "Passing Place" Signsieve … <sniggle—insert eye roll> Our weather? Well, we had some liquid sunshine to start our day, clouds, sun, blustery wind—think that covers it <giggle> Image of Midge-Proof Nettingbut it did turn into an amazing day. We were on our own from 11:30-3pm at Dunvegan Castle—it belongs to the Chieftain of the MacLeod clan and includes lovely gardens … where I was attacked by midges whilst trying to get some lovely photos (most of my photos are in my good camera still I’ll upload those to either Flickr or SmugMug when I get home—and have a better Dunvegan Castle Store of Lanterns in Dunvegan Castle Blue Irises at Dunvegan Castle Marc Playing Autoharp Isle of Skye Coastal Vista Near Lighthouse Lighthouse Nearing "Sunset"internet connection). Last stop was Neist Lighthouse—involving plenty of walking … Dinner in town after touring the castle and town was the plan, but Marc couldn’t get reservations at a decent time, so we headed Sundog Near "Sunset" at Keepers Cottageback to the cottage and made a quick, but delightful (and late—9pm!) meal.
Friday. Our last day to play … but all of the wind and walking has taken a toll on me. I’m taking today to recover whilst everyone else has fun checking out dino tracks (at Three Brothers) and a fairy glen. I’ll be spending the time trying to recover, finishing up my blog entry, adding photos and maybe doing a bit of tidying up around the cottage. The CIVers will be back by 3-ish pm to help with clean up and packing up in preparation for our early departure tomorrow. (I must admit … I am enjoying the quiet—and quick access to the internet <teehee> in their absence …)
Saturday morning, at an obscenely early hour, we must begin our trip back to Inverness for everyone to catch their trains and planes. Sandy and I will spend the night at Waverley Guest House, then move on into the next leg of our adventure.
If you have a Google account (maybe even if you don’t), you can get into the map showing where we traveled—courtesy of Pace. Each days travel is colour coded. Even our day on the Uig Bay should be posted (at some point—he’s a bit behind in getting all of the days posted). I’d love to get the app from him so I can do the same with the rest of our trip, but maps each so much of my data plan <insert pout>.
So, my friends … another leg of our journey is coming to an end. I hope you are having fun following the CIVers adventure. May your day, your weekend and upcoming week be blessed with little serendipitous gems. Until next Friday—slainté!

 

FIFTH WEEK: Yorkshire Dales, Glasgow, Edinburgh and on to Inverness

IT IS NICE TO SLOW DOWN A WEE BIT. Our last one-nighter (for a while) in the Dales wasYorkshire Dales Creek and Bridgelovely. We both slept quite well even though it took a bit to settle in (my ankle was being a bit of a nuisance). Our drive up to Glasgow took five hours, three of which were 20-40mph, windy roads through the Dales. Beautiful scenery, with changing flora and fauna—mostly sheep, with sheep and cows sharing the same fields. There were black and white ??? (with a solid black bit in their middle section), proper “chocolate-milk” cows (dark brown all over) and “normal” spotted black and white. Rock Walls AboundThere were parts of the countryside that had hidden treasures we couldn’t stop to photograph because there were no turnouts to stop in: drop-dead gorgeous churches, wall after stone wall fences and stone outbuildings that had me oohing and aaahing (Sandy, not so much), and the rich green colours of the fields mixed with wildflowers. It was quite calming for me, and gave me something to entertain my mind whilst driving. (click on photos to enlarge)

“We’re off the map now …” Sandy and I have made that our private joke. All of the Land Trust maps have N. Ireland, Wales and England on them—and even though Scotland is part of the UK, it is conspicuous by its absence on the maps. We thought that strange. Oh, well …

Scotland welcomed us with a right proper downpour whilst on the motorway—severe enough to drop speeds from 70mph to 30! And the temp dropped fro 25C to 14C before the deluge hit … then proceeded to go back up to 25C. I was glad when it was done! We’ve been rained on twice on Saturday whilst walking—thankfully the worst part was while we were in Sainsbury’s getting a few groceries.

Glasgow—I don’t understand the feelings some people have for this beautiful city. View from Glasgow Hostel“Nothing to see”, “industrial”, “boring” … I delight in the areas I am able to see on foot. A massive park just opposite the hostel, a botanical park about a mile away—and the hardscape of buildings Glasgow Museum/Architecture Fountain (with seagull) at Glasgow Park Nature's Showcase in Glasgowand Fountain at Glasgow Parktrees is beautiful. (panoramic shot—definitely click to see entire shot)

Our Glasgow hostel is lovely … perhaps an old hotel? But there are a zillion (well … approximately 54) steps to our room (on the third floor) and there’s one more flight of stairs after our landing. And there are more stairs to get down to the self-catering kitchen. My knee and ankle are not appreciating all the stairs. They will be happy to be in Edinburgh—elevators in the hostels (yay!!) This is not stopping me from walking about around town. For me, Sunday was spent making reservations for accommodations for the last half of our trip. Sandy went off on a day trip with a touring company, exploring castles etc.

Our roommates have been fantastic—this is what I love about Hostelling! One from Australia was fretting all day about her luggage (which had been lost due to a short layover in Abi-Dabi—misspelled, I’m sure—and had been mislaid at the first hotel she’d stayed at). She relaxed when it finally was found and retrieved—she left the next day. Another was a UK mother-daughter “team” walking from place to place, averaging 150 miles a day. Wow.

We’re just about finished up with Edinburgh … one more night with a new room (so we’ve been “kicked-out” (it’s Thursday) till the check-in at 3pm. We may have slowed down stay-wise, but we certainly haven’t slowed down walking-wise <insert grin … and an eye roll> since we’ve been averaging 4-6 miles the couple of days. Oh … my.

I do have photos to upload, but the connection at the Edinburgh hostel is marginal for that—I’ll see what I can do today …

Tomorrow is a travel day for us. Departing Edinburgh (my favourite city, hands down) and will get into Inverness at some point on Friday. I don’t think we can check in till 3pm—maybe our room will be ready (I’m hoping …), but I’ve found they are pretty rigid about check-in times over here. It’s only an overnight stay—we’ll need to be ready quite early to meet up with the Celtic Invasion Vacation group. I’m excited—I haven’t seen the “Regulars” in quite some time. And there will be new faces to get acquainted with. I can hardly wait … even if the weather may be the wettest I’ve encountered on the CIV tours. I’ve got my raincoat and Sandy has a rain poncho, so we’re good to go. It’s the wind I’m worried about. Lots and lots of wind here on the east coast of Scotland. The brunt of the storms apparently sweep through from the west coast—and that’s where we are headed. Oh, dear. <insert a winky smile—teehee>

Lately, I’ve been leaving you with rather verbose blog entries. My apologies, but it’s how my brain works. I’ll bid you farewell until next Friday—but leave you with a few last photos (and apologise if one is sideways—my attempts to right it has been unsuccessful … sniff).
Edinburgh: Top of Leith-Giraffe SculptureWaverley Tower and PiperHaggis, Neeps and Tatties at The Whisky ExperienceBeautiful Edinburgh Castle: Bits and Pieces

Edinburgh Castle Cannon—Waverley Tower In Its Site Next Friday, we will be on our last full day of our CIV tour—hmmm … I may need to hold off till Saturday to post, so please bear with me if you don’t see it on Friday. Have a blessed Friday, weekend and a delightful upcoming week—remember to keep an eye out for serendipitous blessings … cheers!

 

WEEK FOUR: Good-Bye Wales … Hello Yorkshire!

OUR FOURTH WEEK HAS been filled with more one- and two-night stays than  three-night stays at hostels and BnBs. I know I’m not thrilled with the one-nighters—nor the two-nighters even—but I must be slowing down a wee bit because even the three-night stays are wearing me down and not allowing time to explore. Or maybe it’s just that those are too few. In either case, we’re finally slowing down a little and enjoying the areas. This week will be the last of the shorter stays (well, mostly). From now on it’ll be three- and four-plus nighters that hopefully will allow for more exploration  <insert happy dance>

Holyhead Beach at SunsetI think Llanberis has been the poshest of our hostels so far and Brecon Becon has been the roughest—but not in a bad way. BB is simply more remote—and appears to be a favourite for backpackers (as was Llanberis’ hostel). Whilst at Brecon, we’d planned on doing laundry, but their washing machine was on the fritz. Snowdonia's Cloud-Shrouded MountainsBecause of the remoteness (and the fact that the way “out” was up a rather steep drive), there really were no short walkabouts that could happen for the “Gimp Sisters” so we chilled. No wifi till we checked in at Llanberis—just the beauty surrounding us that we couldn’t View from Brecon Beaconexplore. Oh. By the way. These were the first two hostels I’ve been to in a while that had catered meals—a wee bit pricey (£9 for dinner and £6 for breakfast), but decent and filling!

Seems we’re having more than our share of hiccups but we are managing to make things work despite the problems.

Our one-nighter at Brecon (without wifi—or phone service) wasDowntown Hay-on-Wye followed by a three-nighter in Hay-on-Wye. Apparently I hadn’t noticed how close the two locations were—only about 25-30 minutes up the road <insert eye roll> Oopsie. Oh, well. The Swan at Hay (hotel)We needed a break from the “rustic” stuff … and a chance to recuperate. And get our laundry done—by now, I was needing to wear things two-three days in a row! Ugh. Our first night at The Swan at the Hay we were told there were no self-service launderettes in town. I thought that odd. The hotel, of course, The Joys of Laundrywould gladly do laundry for us—charging by the piece (standard for hotels). Each of us had a bag full of laundry. That was definitely not an option, so we started laundering our clothes in the bathroom. Sandy Laundrette and A Bit Moretried to wash all of hers and I chose a selection of items to get me through for a couple more days till we could find a launderette. Trying to find things to hang all the clothes on was hilarious. I had three braided elastic lines, but finding something to attach them to was proving problematic. Getting to the sink and toilet required some gymnastics. And all I could think of was “what is the staff going to think when they come to freshen the room?” That made me laugh so hard.

We arrived in Hay on the last day of the Hay Festival—a literary festival. Hay is known for its many bookstores—it is a delight to pop into all of the shops and rummage through all of the books. I looked at the festival schedule, hoping to find something interesting to attend, but no … there were some authors reading pieces from their books, but the speakers seemed to be more aligned with politics and socio-economic stuff. Not my cup of tea. So, wandering the streets and taking photos (away from the festival) was what we did on our first day. By the way—Sandy’s foot is much now—thank God! And Hay is where we met up with Jo and Ian. We had a delightful time with them—they showed us around town, showed us where the laundrette was (YAY!) and we had a lovely meal at one of the few open pubs—many of the shops were recovering from the long weekend event and closed up on Monday! We walked some more, but I put a damper on things with an upset stomach, so we returned to The Swan for tea and some wonderfully diverse conversations. All in all, we thoroughly enjoyed our day—and on into the night—with Jo and Ian. They have a delightfully informative and fun video blog, “Something Vloggy” that is terrific—all about castles and waterfalls in Wales. We were finally ready to turn the lights out at 11pm! Waaay past my bedtime. But so worth it! Nearly twelve hours of visiting and wandering together. Truly delightful!

Riverside Walk to the WarrenOur third day in town, we split up—I was desperate to get laundry done and Sandy needed to walk. So laundry was my first order of business and during the wash and dry cycles, I did a little walkabout, getting errands done at the chemist and Spar. After sorting out all that, I was free to walkabout around the town.  It is beautiful with many interesting features. There’s a lovely path (actually two—one just above the other) that takes you along the River Wye. Very picturesque.

Wednesday was departure day for us. We said good-bye to Hay and mosied up to West Yorkshire to stay with another of my FB friends, Anne. Anne Our Hostess with the Mostess Anne and Sandy in the KitchenWe were not expected until six, so we occupied our day with little stops here and there—and a healthy walkabout around Brighouse. A lovely, leisurely day of travel. Anne fed and pampered us royally. She’s taken us around Haworth (pronounced how-with), pointed out “Crinkly-Bottom” (Cromwell Bottom) as we drove by, we did a walk through Halifax Piece Hall (as in “piece work” of fabric)—the last remaining cloth hall in England … and then we went to B&M for fresh supplies of Jelly Babies <insert monster grin>—sniggle—then took everything we bought home and finally went back out to a lovely dinner at Toby Carvery (delightful—Sandy enjoyed the Yorkshire pudding … as did I). We returned home for a nice spot of tea (and parkin). With all we’ve been fed, I would expect my weight to be up … (well, maybe it is), but had my first proper weigh in and I’m 171.9!) Friday—today—we must say good-bye to this lovely lady and move on up towards Inverness. Friday will be a one-nighter at Buckden in the Yorkshire Dells, Saturday-Tuesday am will be Glasgow, Scotland and Tuesday-Friday is Edinburgh … and finally, Inverness on Friday. We’ll try to get up there as early as we can so we can do some roaming.

So, my friends … I leave you once again to peruse the photos—I may add more later (once in Glasgow … perhaps). Have a blessed Friday and weekend and I’ll have things to post next Friday! Toodles!

 

WEEK THREE: Bushmills, Dublin, Holyhead and Llanberis

AAAAH. FINALLY, WE WERE getting into the swing of a real vacation in this last week. There were only two hiccups that popped up—a twisted ankle (foolishly not wearing my ankle brace), which is definitely on the mend and not holding me back much and needing to do a little shuffle of accommodations/car rental to adjust for arrival times in Holyhead, Wales.

Note to self: always verify car rental hours before scheduling ferries or any other conveyances (Hertz closes their doors at 1700, ferry arrives 1830—oopsie). And, don’t rush when making new accommodations—be sure everything is right before clicking the “Book” button.

We said good bye to Donegal and Ireland as we wandered up through a zillion roundabouts—even I (lover of roundabouts) was getting tired of them … just a wee bit. We saw sheep, cattle, trees … more sheep and glimpses of shoreline—unfortunately, Gabby chose the fastest route that took us through more inland roads than coastal roads. The coastal route would have been glorious, but it would have added too much time. Bushmills and the Giant’s Causeway were our destination for this bit of travel. And it did not disappoint. The weather and scenery were amazing. We even had time to attend church during our short stay in Bushmills. And, no … we did not go to the distillery. Nature was our goal along this lovely bit of Northern Ireland. Click on the photos to enlarge them.Red Telephone Box Giant's Causeway Giant's Causeway Erosion Patterns at the Causeway

From Bushmills, we traveled back down south, touching on the outskirts of Belfast—a huge metropolis—before working our way back into Dublin and our hostel for three more nights. Each time we arrive, we find new things to do—wondering the streets of Dublin. We were checking out the farmers market one block off O’Connell Street when my ankle twisted on uneven pavement—it really pays to keep a keen eye out for uneven surfaces if you have ankle issues  I was not <pout> and it knocked half a day out of our sightseeing.

I’ve been wearing both knee brace and ankle brace since the incident on Monday (hate wearing them) and all is well. It took a couple of days of taxi rides into town before I felt comfortable walking around and by Wednesday, we were back to “normalish” touristing.

The first of the “recovery days” was spent on a Gray Lines tour of Wicklow Mountains and the Glendalough area. The scenery was magnificent, the stops we made had marvellous photo ops … and our tour guide, Richie, was wonderful—a great commentator, full of that Irish “gift of gab” (in a very good way) and fun to chat with. There was plenty of giggles on his tour. The history of the area was told in a way to hold your attention—nothing worse than a dry bit of history to put you to sleep—not with Richie. So glad we made the trip! Click on the photos to enlarge.

GrayLine's Driver, Richie

Great commentator and conversationalist, Richie was our tour guide for the day on the Wicklow Mountain and Glendalough tour.

roof and trees near Glendalough Military Instillation on Glendalough/Wicklow Mtn Tour Glendalough/Wicklow Mountains Creek Near Guinness Lake Glendalough Tower and Graveyard Glendalough Scenery Church and Round Tower at Glendalough

Thursday was ferry ride day into Holyhead, Wales and we had a good time. The Stena Lines is a lovely boat to ferry across the water—and I booked us seats up in the lounge, so it was even better.

Because of the mess-up by moi, we only had the one night in Llanberis, so not a ton of time to wander in Snowdonia <insert huge pout> This is a gloriously beautiful area and deserves multiple days to begin to absorb its beauty. This will require another trip <insert grin> to make sure I get “my Snowdonia time” in. Definitely! Actually, Sandy and I talked about it and decided we’d make sure to spend a few days here on our return trip—after visiting my London friends and before we hop on the ferry to go back to Dublin.

Aaah. One final note: It’s called “Payback”—Sandy was trying to wrangle some horses that decided to come out of a gate that we had permission to open (to turn the car Muddy print on a shoearound) … and one stepped on her foot <insert grimmace> so we’re being super cautious today. Only the front half of the hoof stepped on her foot, thankfully, but the knee-jerk reaction to pull it away may have caused more of a problem …

We did a little look around in Llanberis, but she’s alternately icing it and keeping it elevated. We’ll see how things go—I’ll be catering to her needs as she did to me when I had my little incident.
Llanberis and our hostel (click on photos to enlarge):
Little Cabins at the Hostel View of Hostel Grounds View of Hills of LLanberis LLanberis View from Hostel

And … now, it’s time to get this blog launched so you can read it. Have a blessed Friday and weekend.